The Destruction of the Feminine Archetype: A Fifth Business Analysis

Harold MarshHarwood once said “Men marry women with the hope they will never change. Women marry men with the hope they will change. Invariably they are both disappointed”

Harold Marsh Harwood once said “Men marry women with the hope they will never change. Women marry men with the hope they will change. Invariably they are both disappointed” (Harwood). Through most of history men and women have been in constant conflict with each other. The conflicts have been mental, physical, political, and social. The reason for all the conflict is believed to be caused by the vast internal and external differences between men and women. The desires, goals and ways of thinking are very different between men and women. The reaction to these differences has caused intentional and unintentional harm to society and individuals. Multiple examples of this are in the novel Fifth Business written by Robertson Davies. The novel focuses on the lives of three men, Dunstan, Boy and Paul. A constant theme throughout their lives and the book is the men deciding the fates of the women around them and inevitably hurting any woman who fits feminine gender stereotypes and feminine archetypes, specifically motherly figures. The men do these things because each one of them suffers from psychological issues and past experiences that cause them to have a warped view of women, relationships and femininity. The experiences of their past and the mental problems they face in their adult lives causes the men to react badly to femininity and the women who display it. The reader sees this when examining the relationships these men have with women who are traditionally feminine. Now one could argue that femininity has nothing to do with the relationships Boy, Dunstan and Paul have with women and that they have problems with women in general. That is wrong because not all the relationships they have with women end up bad. When examining the relationships, the men have with women who do not fit traditional femininity these relationships end up being much more successful. The novel takes the reader on a journey of imperfect characters and how these imperfections impact those around them.

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What Does It Mean to be a Dancer?

Webster’s Dictionary defines dancing as “to move one’s body rhythmically usually to music,” but to be a dancer is much more than that

Everybody dance now! Webster’s Dictionary defines dancing as “to move one’s body rhythmically usually to music,” but to be a dancer is much more than that. Anybody can be a dancer, even people who are not good at dancing. People think to be a dancer you need talent and success but that’s not true. To be a dancer you need determination and passion for dance.

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